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're talking with mike magner, the "national journal" energy and environment managing editor. he's also got this terrific book called poisoned legacy, great read about bp's rise to power. bp both on how they handled the gulf coast spill but also some other things in their record. mike, how bad are things in the coast right now? >> oh, boy, there is a long way to go on the cleanup. bp spilled an estimated five million barrels of oil into the gulf and in addition to a lot of natural gas that leaked and then when they were trying to clean it up, they used all of these dispersants, these chemicals that have really never been used on that scale. they cleaned up a lot of it by burning some of it off the surface and scrubbing what landed on the beaches but i talked yesterday to people in louisiana who say that there's still at least a million barrels out there. some of it is in wetlands in louisiana that's really difficult to clean up. and some of it -- because of the dispersants is still floating around out there. in particles and at
this on the eve of an election. again, i'm obviously not positing some huge conspiracy. in our environment, in our hyperpartisan environment, most people in a situation like this seeing any possibility for political advantage would have raced to expose something like this, right? general petraeus was confronted about this two weeks ago, right? two weeks before the election. chose -- ultimately decided to resign but didn't decide to resign at that moment. was there part of the reason he did not decide to resign immediately upon being confronted on this, he knew it would be embarrassing for the administration on the eve of an election? that's a reasonable inference. there's so much we don't know because so many people individually have not spoken publicly about the chain of events and their motivations in terms of keeping quiet at a moment of maximum political volatility. >> just to clarify because i've raised a lot of questions here, my biggest concern isn't what happened at the end. i understand there are a lot of conservatives that are going to be thinking that this was -- >> cover-up. >> benghaz
things, to create a nice environment for them to enjoy and the group that came out to cover this said we expected you to be an a-hole. we expected you to be upset down and backwards with granting access to us. and i went, this is who i am. >> are you a nice guy? >> he's a very nice guy. >> this is not who you see. there's always that busch brother problem. baldwin brother problem. >> don't put me in that group. >> seriously, are you a nice guy who is just misunderstood? >> i have a fiery attitude when i put the helmet on. it's just that mentality of when you go into battle and you're a sports guy, you have to do what it takes to win. sometimes it rubs people the wrong way. especially the fabric of the way everything hases viewed these days has to be so clean, crisp cut and you can't have any blemishes. coach bobby knight is a guy i looked up to, tossing chairs, that's how my dad taught me. >> i love how you drive, first of all. watching this documentary, i was struck by how much you seem to mistrust and not like the media. i don't know if it's just specific in nascar. >> we're nice. >> o
-- there might be a t.a.r.p. like environment where we do go over the cliff, the cliff, whatever that means, exactly, but we don't hit the first set of deadlines. something doesn't pass the first time, but then eventually some of the members of both sides are brought to heal by the prospect of -- >> the real -- not just the pending doom but doom actually present in their laps for a second. that seems like a possible scenario to me. i do think there still is, despite all sharp rhetoric, i still think on the republican side, which is so critical, this notion of the other thing you heard throughout all of the commentary for the last week and over the weekend is that the implications of the election still are -- is sinking in. republicans still -- you see with this continued criticism of romney's comments and so on. that's still setting? >> all right. you mentioned benghazi. let's go to the developments there in the on going controversy over the administration's response to the attack on the u.s. consulate in bengha benghazi. members of congress are now vowing to find out why the cia's conclusi
tax, it forces us to shut down ranches and farms. it's not good for the environment and future generations and americans in general. reporter: he paid the irs $2 million when he inherited the ranch more than two decades ago. at this point, his children will have to pay $13 million. reporter: that will jump to 52 million estates who will be affected by this. farmers say it hurts them because all their money is in the dirt and not in their pocket. jon: the fact he pay taxes on your life and that he pay them again when you die, it's a great system thank you well, we finally seeing some compromise between capitol hill and the white house? details of what takes place at that meeting between the president and congressional leaders. is there some agreement here somewhere? jenna: plus, we are watching the volatile situation between israel and hamas militants. day three of airstrikes. israel is wondering if there is a ground assault on the way. we have answers ahead. [ malannouncer ] it'that time of year again. time for cii price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink cast
the way we govern our country. it is a good, therapeutic way to look in a nonhostile environment as to where we need to go with the country. >> john: the fact it is a nonhostile environment means it won't be covered on most cable news outlets. i'm looking over the roster of speakers. of course you're there as well as james carvel and mary madeline. i guess their merge is a model for this kind of event. you have trent lott and ted strickland, jonathan capehart and another married couple, avalon and hoover. it seems like a really, really inspiring roster of people. so i guess let me ask you why did things turn out the way they did last week on election day? >> you know, first of all, it was close but i think that -- you know, most of the pundits got it right. that is i think the people sense that the economy was getting better while slowly things were kind of turning in the right direction. and i think they were willing to give the president the benefit of the doubt under those circumstances. i also think that the
, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... oh, let me guess --ou see this? more washington gridlock. no, it's worse -- look, our taxes are about to go up. not the taxes on our dividends though, right? that's a big part of our retirement. oh, no, it's dividends, too. the rate on our dividends would more than double. but we depend on our dividends to help pay our bills. we worked hard to save. well, the president and congress have got to work together to stop this dividend tax hike. before it's too late. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which
's the rush? be happy. be healthy. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >> alisyn: good morning, everyone. today is monday, november 19. i'm alisyn camerota. paula broadwell is back home with her family and speak out. but that's not who lawmakers want answers from. now a top democrat saying something doesn't smell right. >> steve: and it's been a christmas tradition for 60 years right along the pacific. but not anymore. you can thank the atheists for wrecking it for a lot of christians out in california. >> brian: santa monica. soldier brings an entire stadium to its feet. >> up with -- we've special treat for you as well. >> brian: that's as loud as the super bowl. that soldier home from afghanistan. just joins us live on "fox & friends" right now. >> hey y'all, it's paula deen and you're watching "fox & friends." >> steve: can you imagine
exactly how to get things done, exactly in a partisan political environment. sound familiar? what lessons want we learn from him? joining us now, author of a new fantastic book called "thomas jefferson, the art of power." john meachem joins us live. >> you talk about how thomas jefferson, as he gets up first thing in the morning, as many people are now, he had a ritual he would plunge his feet into a base son of cold quarter. >> it is. there's a groove on the floor where the bowl was brought in. but he lived to be 84 so it's a pretty good policy. >> maybe i need a bucket. thomas jefferson was a guy who loved politics. he loved to design stuff, he was a big thinker, he kept great details but at the end of the day he was a guy who could bring two sides together. north, south, come on, let's wind up in the middle. >> he had endless appetite for art, for wine, for women, for architectural books and also power. he was born to it in virginia. the eldest son in an important family. i learned from a very early age. he was was a political apprentice. for 40 years he was pretty much in public offic
-- >> environment, economy, on and on and on. >> environmental region. >> thanks, christy. >> you're welcome. >>> wait until you hear what mitt romney is saying now, that is coulding up. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are, or may become pregnant or are breast feeding should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possi
was not sufficiently angry enough in this environment that the primary process was fought in. he wasn't anti-intellectual enough. >> and downplayed his conservatism. >> that was the biggest mistake. he downplayed his conservatism from the very beginning. and i want to say again, mark halperin, the anti-intellectualism in the republican party over the past decade has been growing. that's another thing bobby jindal has been talking about. that's got to change. that's got to change. we not only have to win over hispanics, we've got to win over educated hispanics. educated african-americans. educated white people. educated people of all races with ph.d.s, an area we've been losing for decades. >> and joe, there's another issue that i know you think a lot about and thought a lot about that huntsman also talked about which is afghanistan and ending the war. that's another populist issue that i think republicans missed in 2012. the president was for winding down the war. you had others who didn't run that thought that that was an issue to tap into across the board populists including a lot of the g
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)